Tennessee Smart Yards Native Plants

A comprehensive database of Tennessee native plants

Alabama Azalea

Alabama Azalea

Rhododendron alabamense

Part sun to open shade; medium to moderately dry moisture level; rocky soil; acidic pH.

4-6 feet height by 5-6 feet spread; blooms late April into early May; white flowers with a yellow blotch; elongated fruit capsules.

Growth Rate:  ?

Maintenance:  Subject to diseases and insect pests including aphids, white flies and scale.  Good cultural practices help reduce damage.  Use a yearly addition of organic mulch to retain moisture and reduce temperature fluctuations.  Avoid application of fertilizers which tend to create fertilizer burns.  Rhododendrons are sensitive to high levels of fertilizer salts.

Propagation:  Seed germination code A.  Moderately easy from seed and softwood cuttings.  Seeds readily hybridize so seeds collected from the garden may produce plants that do not resemble the parents.

Native Region:  Middle Tennessee

This low-growing, deciduous azalea is a delightful landscape plant. One of the most fragrant native azaleas with large, showy, floppy flowers that have a distinct lemon fragrance.  Occurs naturally in dry, open woods, on rocky hill sites and on wooded slopes and may spread by underground runners. Does not run true to type so purchase it in flower to assure what you are getting.  All parts are poisonous to humans.  Attracts bees.

shrub;sun/shade;medium;rocky
shrub;sun/shade;dry;rocky
shrub;shade;medium;rocky
shrub;shade;dry;rocky

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