Tennessee Smart Yards Native Plants

A comprehensive database of Tennessee native plants

Sweet Black-eyed Susan, Sweet Coneflower

Sweet Black-eyed Susan, Sweet Coneflower

Rudbeckia subtomentosa

Full to part sun, moderately wet to moderately dry moisture level, tolerant of a range of soils including clay.  3-5 feet height, blooms summer into fall, yellow flowers, naturalizes by re-seeding at a moderate rate.

Germination Code:  C(30)

Native Region:  Only found in Stewart and Montgomery counties

This long-lived and easy-to-grow plant is designated a “Threatened Species” in Tennessee.  Showy, scented flowers. Tolerates hot humid summers but not drought.  Attracts butterflies and bees.

flower;sun;wet;clay
flower;sun;wet;loam
flower;sun;wet;sand
flower;sun;medium;clay
flower;sun;medium;loam
flower;sun;medium;sand
flower;sun;dry;clay
flower;sun;dry;loam
flower;sun;dry;sand
flower;sun/shade;wet;clay
flower;sun/shade;wet;loam
flower;sun/shade;wet;sand
flower;sun/shade;medium;clay
flower;sun/shade;medium;loam
flower;sun/shade;medium;sand
flower;sun/shade;dry;clay
flower;sun/shade;dry;loam
flower;sun/shade;dry;sand

One response to “Sweet Black-eyed Susan, Sweet Coneflower

  1. joystewart June 28, 2020 at 4:08 pm

    Information from “Plant of the Week” post by Mary Ann King, Pine Ridge Gardens of London, Arkansas.

    Rudbeckia subtomentosa ‘Henry Eilers’

    This particular selection of sweet coneflower was discovered by nurseryman ‘Henry Eilers’ in a railroad right-of-way, and then was introduced into the nursery trade by Larry Lowman. It exhibits all of the characteristics of Sweet coneflower except the petals are rolled or quilled. The foliage is fragrant, particularly when dried. Full sun to a bit of shade, tolerant of deer, some drought & and dry soils as well as clay soils. Bees, butterflies & other pollinators are attracted to the flowers. 3-5’ with stiff stems.

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