Tennessee Smart Yards Native Plants

A comprehensive database of Tennessee native plants

Prairie Coneflower, Yellow Coneflower

Prairie Coneflower, Yellow Coneflower

Ratibida pinnata

Full sun, medium to moderately dry moisture level, rich soil preferred but tolerates poor soils including clay, moderately acid to neutral pH.  3-5 feet height, blooms for a long period in summer, yellow flowers, spreads slowly by re-seeding.

Germination Code:  C(30)

Native Region:  Scattered statewide but primarily in Middle Tennessee

Tall, showy plant that is easy to grow from seed and very durable.  Best planted en masse because individual plants are narrow and sparsely leafed.  Attracts butterflies, bees and birds.

flower;sun;medium;clay
flower;sun;medium;loam
flower;sun;medium;sand
flower;sun;dry;clay
flower;sun;dry;loam
flower;sun;dry;sand

One response to “Prairie Coneflower, Yellow Coneflower

  1. joystewart June 15, 2017 at 11:58 pm

    I have grown this coneflower over a period of about 10 years in a variety of places and times so I hope I have enough experience to comment on how it will behave for others. It is not a spectacular flower but it is attractive and very dependable. It is very easy from seed (so be careful not to use too much), stands straight and tall on its own in spite of its rather tall height, and endures dependably year after year. It is also more of a spreading, re-seeder than you might first guess. If you are looking for something tall, colorful, and dependable, this species is a good bet.

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