Tennessee Smart Yards Native Plants

A comprehensive database of Tennessee native plants

Wild Bergamont

Wild Bergamont

Monarda fistulosa

Full to part sun, moderately wet to dry moisture level, adapted to most soils including rocky and clay, slightly acid to neutral pH.  3-4 ft. height, blooms in summer, pinkish lavender flowers, spreads readily by re-seeding and can be aggressive.

Germination Code:  A

Native Region:  Statewide

Showy flowers.  Easy to grow but can be weedy.  Needs good air circulation to reduce powdery mildew.  Attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds.

flower; sun; wet;clay
flower;sun;wet;loam
flower;sun;wet;sand
flower;sun;medium;clay
flower;sun;medium;loam
flower;sun;medium;sand
flower;sun;dry;clay
flower;sun;dry;loam
flower;sun;dry;sand
flower;sun/shade;wet;clay
flower;sun/shade;wet;loam
flower;sun/shade;wet;sand
flower;sun/shade;medium;clay
flower;sun/shade;medium;loam
flower;sun/shade;medium;sand
flower;sun/shade;dry;clay
flower;sun/shade;dry;loam
flower;sun/shade/dry;sand

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One response to “Wild Bergamont

  1. joystewart May 28, 2016 at 11:57 pm

    In 2007, I planted a large area of my yard to native plants by seed, and this species was a fairly large part of the planting. For a long time, I really enjoyed having it in my yard. But after 10 years, I am aware of just how much it has spread and the fact that it is slowly taking control of the entire planting. Now I wish I hadn’t planted it even though it has a lot of other good features. It is crowding out other plants, even trying to crowd out my Prairie Dock and that is one hard plant to crowd out. I called the nursery from which I bought the seed to ask how they deal with its aggressiveness when they add this species to their seed mixes. The fellow that I spoke with is specifically responsible for propagation of Wild Bergamont at the nursery, and he said that this species usually pretty much just stays put for them and is sometimes even difficult to propagate. He couldn’t explain my experience. Anyway, I just want to post an advisory for other people considering this species. If you are looking for good solid coverage, this plant is great. If you want other species to endure over time, I advise against using it. If you have it and need to get rid of it, I will add that an early spring (single) spraying with Round-Up when it is about 1-2 inches high results in complete kill, and it is also not too hard to dig out because the roots form a shallow interlocking solid mat that comes up reasonably easily with a shovel (provided you don’t have yards and yards of it like I do).

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